Posted 5 days ago

Reblog if you want a Black Widow movie.

grokkengrumbles:

thevioletprincess:

image

"Do You?"

If I ever stop reblogging this, assume I’m watching the movie at that time.

Posted 1 week ago

vastderp-placeholder:

rainbowbarnacle:

An Engineer’s Guide to Advanced Cat Yodeling

OW OW OWWWW MY BELLY HURTS FROM LAUGHING AND I THINK I MIGHT THROW UP

PLAY IT AGAIN PLAY IT AGAIN

(Source: bloodstainbowbarnacle)

Posted 2 weeks ago
Posted 2 weeks ago
One of the challenges of extended singleness that’s not often discussed is the idea that you are no one’s special person. I realise, even as I write, that this seems glaringly obvious. But there is a subtlety to this idea that I’ve not seen explored in the singleness discussions that I’ve encountered. There can be a loneliness to being alone, sure. That much is obvious. But there is a unique, entirely other kind of loneliness to being alone when everyone around you has their one person – that person who is their responsibility, their care, their focus. It’s the one they check in with, the one whose opinion they will defer to, the one whose schedule they will shape their lives around. It is lonely to have nobody, but it is another kind of loneliness to be nobody’s somebody. As nobody’s somebody, you become the dispensable variable in relational equations. It is you who might have to change your intended meetup time to fit better with what your girlfriend’s boyfriend wants. Your sister might need to pause in the middle of a deep and meaningful conversation with you to take a call from her husband at work. Your plans with a friend will fall through because her toddler is teething. If you don’t know your guy friend’s new love interest, chances are you won’t know your guy friend for much longer, either. You will grow accustomed to being the third person, or fifth, or seventh in gatherings where all the other attendees are pairs. All of this is good and fine. It’s healthy, even. It’s sanctifying and humanising to be reminded that our own needs are not paramount. It is good to be adaptable, and to learn to hold things loosely. It’s good to know that others’ lives don’t carry the same freedoms that singleness does. But that doesn’t mean it won’t hurt to be reminded that everybody you care about most is aligning their lives closely to another person’s, moulding their days and hours and moments to fit another’s, but that person is not you. You are loved by many but not at the top of anyone’s priority list.
Posted 2 weeks ago
Posted 3 weeks ago
Posted 1 month ago

scienceyoucanlove:

Tony Hansberry II was a ninth-grader. The new sewing technique he has developed helps to to reduce the risk of complications and simplifies the hysterectomy procedure for less seasoned surgeons.

His goal is to attend medical school and become a neurosurgeon. For Tony, it all began in school. He attends Darnell-Cookman School of the Medical Arts, a medical magnet school for middle and high schoolstudents. As part of its integrated medical curriculum, students receive medical instruction, but are also exposed to medical professionals who demonstrate advanced surgical techniques with specialized equipment. His lead medical teacher, Angela TenBroeck, told the Florida Times-Union that Hansberry is a typical student, but is way ahead of his classmates when it comes to surgical skills “I would put him up against a first year medical student. He is an outstanding young man,” she said.

During his summer break, Tony volunteered at the University of Florida’s Center for Simulation Education and Safety Research (CSESaR) at Shands Jacksonville Hospital. He was supervised by Dr. Brent Siebel, a urogynecologist, and Bruce Nappi, the administrative director. Together they worked with Tony exploring the mannequins and simulation equipment that physicians and nurses use in training. He became quite interested in invasive surgery and using laparoscopic instruments. As the story goes, one day an obstetrics and gynecology professor asked the group to help him figure out why no one was using a particular surgical device, called an endostitch for hysterectomy suturing procedures. This long medical device has clamps on the end, but Tony used the instrument in a new way allowing for vertical suturing, instead of the traditional horizontal method. After two days, Tony had perfected and tested his new technique. He soon developed a science fair project comparing the suturing times of the vertical endostitch closures vs the horizontal closures using a conventional needle driver instrument.

His results showed he was able to stitch three times faster using this new method. Use of this inventive technique may lead to shorter surgical times and improved patient treatment. 

Found on http://www.oshpd.ca.gov/
through 

Neurons want food

Posted 1 month ago
Posted 1 month ago
Posted 1 month ago
hungryghoast:

omercifulheaves:

So hey, it turns out that Gillian Anderson dressed up like Morticia Addams was something we all needed in our lives.

[takes a knee]

hungryghoast:

omercifulheaves:

So hey, it turns out that Gillian Anderson dressed up like Morticia Addams was something we all needed in our lives.

[takes a knee]